Wage & Hour

  • May 24, 2024

    3 Tips To Manage Summer's Tricky Child Labor Landscape

    Amid an uptick in enforcement against child labor violations, a changing landscape for state laws on youth employment and the unofficial start of summer hiring season, attorneys tell Law360 three ways employers can stay in compliance with their new and temporary young employees.

  • May 24, 2024

    Liberty University Fights Class Cert. Bid In Time Sheet Suit

    A supervisor of intramural sports at Liberty University can't prove that other workers are similar enough to support collective certification in a suit alleging the university messed with employees' time records to cap their hours at 40 per week to avoid paying overtime wages, the school told a federal judge.

  • May 24, 2024

    Medical Courier Service Settles Drivers' Overtime Suit

    A Georgia-based medical courier service accused of failing to pay its drivers their proper overtime wages has agreed to settle the case, according to an unopposed bid for settlement approval that calls the deal "approximately equal to plaintiffs' best possible day at trial."

  • May 24, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Del Monte Workers Seek $2M Deal Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for the potential final approval of a $2 million deal in a wage and hour class action by Del Monte Foods Inc. plant workers. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • May 23, 2024

    PNC, Loan Officers Ink $12M Deal In Rest Break Suit

    PNC Bank has agreed to pay nearly $12 million to end a class action alleging the bank didn't pay mortgage loan officers for time spent on breaks and failed to issue accurate wage statements, according to a joint motion filed Wednesday in California federal court.

  • May 23, 2024

    $30M Deal Sealed In Cleaners' 15-Year-Old Wage Dispute

    A California federal judge on Thursday placed the final stamp of approval on a $30 million settlement resolving a 15-year-old class action accusing a janitorial company of misclassifying workers as independent contractors, saying the terms of the deal are favorable especially in light of continuing the long-running litigation.

  • May 23, 2024

    Novartis Settles Ex-Saleswoman's Gender Pay Bias Suit

    Pharmaceutical giant Novartis and a former sales representative have agreed to end a suit alleging she was paid over $20,000 less than a male colleague pitching the same product, according to filings in Colorado federal court.

  • May 23, 2024

    FirstKey Sanctioned For Trying To Coerce Workers In OT Suit

    A Texas federal judge sanctioned FirstKey Homes LLC for issuing coercive communications to employees in an apparent effort to steer them from joining a proposed wage and hour class action, finding Wednesday the only purpose the company had was "attempting to undermine the collective action in this case."

  • May 23, 2024

    NC Fintech Atty Sues Paymentus For Gender, Age Bias

    A former senior corporate counsel for cloud-based billing company Paymentus Corp. has slapped her former employer with a $100,000 age and gender discrimination suit in North Carolina federal court, saying she was paid less than her male colleagues and eventually fired for complaining, only to be replaced by a much younger male attorney.

  • May 23, 2024

    Conn. To Expand Paid Sick Leave To Smaller Businesses

    More employees in Connecticut will soon become eligible for paid sick leave after the state's governor gave his blessing on a bill that expands the state's time-off requirements to include smaller businesses.

  • May 23, 2024

    Calif. Panel Gives Restaurant Group's Arbitration Bid New Life

    The arbitration agreement a hospitality company gave to a former employee was not ambiguous, so a trial court must look at a wage and hour case again, a California state appeals court ruled, giving the company's arbitration bid another chance.

  • May 23, 2024

    Amazon Workers' $5.5M COVID Screening Deal Gets Initial OK

    A California federal magistrate judge on Wednesday gave her preliminary blessing to a $5.5 million settlement Amazon agreed to pay to a class of 250,000 employees who accused the digital retail behemoth of failing to pay for time spent undergoing mandatory COVID-19 screenings before their shifts.

  • May 23, 2024

    Calif. Appeals Court Brings Back Axed PAGA Case

    A California appeals court revived a worker's representative claims under the state's Private Attorneys General Act, finding a lower court's order should be revised following a 2023 state Supreme Court ruling clarifying which PAGA claims can be sent to arbitration.

  • May 23, 2024

    Business Groups Fight OT Rule Raising Salary Limits

    A group of business associations urged a Texas federal court to block a 2024 U.S. Department of Labor rule raising the minimum salary on overtime exemption for executive, administrative or professional employees, saying the rule doesn't rectify the errors from a 2017 rule that the same court enjoined.

  • May 23, 2024

    Jackson Lewis Questions Role In Wage Suit After Ch. 11

    Jackson Lewis PC attorneys were unsure if they were able to keep representing more than a dozen Pennsylvania nursing homes as an unpaid-wage case approaches a critical deadline, telling a federal court during a conference Thursday that the Bankruptcy Code suspended their service to a group of defendants who filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy earlier in May.

  • May 23, 2024

    County Tells Full 4th Circ. Inmates' Wage Ruling Went Too Far

    A Fourth Circuit panel decision that determining pay for incarcerated people working at a Baltimore County recycling plant should focus on the purpose of their work unprecedentedly expands the reach of federal labor law, the county said, asking for the full court's intervention.

  • May 23, 2024

    Philly-Area Home Health Co.'s OT Settlement Gets First Nod

    A Pennsylvania federal judge gave an early nod to a deal resolving a proposed class of nurses' overtime suit against a Philadelphia nursing home that allegedly failed to pay its in-home care workers the proper rates for overtime in violation of both state and federal wage laws.

  • May 22, 2024

    Wash. Health System Wants $230M Worker Class Win Axed

    A Washington hospital system is seeking to derail a nearly $230 million judgement in favor of workers in a class wage case, contending the plaintiffs' key expert who testified at a state court trial recommended that jurors calculate damages based on a flawed equation that didn't account for differences in pay classifications.

  • May 22, 2024

    IT Co. Can't Sink Fired Worker's FMLA Retaliation Suit

    A Florida federal judge declined to hand an information technology company an early win in a former worker's suit claiming he was fired after he took medical leave to treat anxiety, ruling that there are enough disputes over whether the company acted illegally to send the case to trial.

  • May 22, 2024

    Justices' CFPB Alliance May Save SEC Courts, Not Chevron

    A four-justice concurrence to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision upholding the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's unique funding scheme last week carries implications for other cases pending before the court that challenge the so-called administrative state, or the permanent cadre of regulatory agencies and career government enforcers who hold sway over vast swaths of American economic life.

  • May 22, 2024

    NJ Biz Groups Say ERISA Preempts State Temp Worker Law

    A group of New Jersey business associations filed an amended challenge to a state law expanding protections for temporary workers, saying the law is superseded by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act and asking a federal court for an indication that it would block the state law on remand.

  • May 22, 2024

    Stryker Agrees To Settle Calif. Misclassification Suit

    Medical device company Stryker told a California federal court Wednesday it has agreed to settle a proposed class action accusing it of misclassifying workers as overtime-exempt and failing to pay them overtime during their mandatory training.

  • May 22, 2024

    Wage Poster From The '80s Can't Save Bar From Liability

    The only tangible information an Illinois bar provided to two former bartenders about their compensation was a poster from the 1980s that lacked detailed pay rates, a federal judge ruled, granting the workers' liability win in their tip credit suit.

  • May 22, 2024

    SC Gov. Signs Earned Wage Access Bill Into Law

    South Carolina has become the fifth state to approve a new law governing so-called earned wage access products, which provide workers with cash advances, as the Palmetto State joins Nevada, Missouri, Wisconsin and Kansas in regulating the products.

  • May 22, 2024

    FLRA Rejects Ky. National Guard's OT Challenge

    The Federal Labor Relations Authority denied the Kentucky National Guard's challenge to an arbitrator's finding that it shorted workers on overtime, ruling that the arbitrator acted within his power and the award was justified.

Expert Analysis

  • Water Cooler Talk: Sick Leave Insights From 'Parks And Rec'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper spoke with Lisa Whittaker at the J.M. Smucker Co. about how to effectively manage sick leave policies to ensure legal compliance and fairness to all employees, in a discussion inspired by a "Parks and Recreation" episode.

  • What CRA Deadline Means For Biden Admin. Rulemaking

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    With the 2024 election rapidly approaching, the Biden administration must race to finalize proposed agency actions within the next few weeks, or be exposed to the chance that the following Congress will overturn the rules under the Congressional Review Act, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Justices Clarify FAA But Leave Behind Important Questions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Bissonnette v. LePage firmly shuts the door on any argument that the Federal Arbitration Act's Section 1 exemption is limited to transportation workers whose employers transport goods on behalf of others, but two major issues remain unresolved, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • What To Expect From The DOL's Final Overtime Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Labor's final overtime rule dramatically increases the salary threshold for white collar workers to be exempt from overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act, so employers should prioritize identifying the potentially affected positions and strategically consider next steps, say Leslie Selig Byrd and Deryck Van Alstyne at Bracewell.

  • Data Shows H-2B Wages May Be Skewed High By Sample Size

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    Occupational Wage and Employment Statistics wage data from April illustrates that smaller sample sizes from less populated areas may be skewing prevailing wages for H-2B visas artificially high, potentially harming businesses that rely on the visa program, says Stephen Bronars at Edgeworth Economics.

  • Refresher On Employee Qualifications For Summer Interns

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    Before companies welcome interns to their ranks this summer, they should consider the extent to which the interns may be entitled to the same legal protections as employees, including the right to be paid for their hours worked and to receive at least minimum wage and overtime, says Kate LaQuay at Munck Wilson.

  • How To Prepare As Employee Data Reporting Deadlines Near

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    As filing deadlines approach, government contractors and private companies alike should familiarize themselves with recent changes to federal and California employee data reporting requirements and think strategically about registration of affirmative action plans to minimize the risk of being audited, say Christopher Durham and Zev Grumet-Morris at Duane Morris.

  • The Practical Effects Of Justices' Arbitration Exemption Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries, that a transportation worker need not work in the transportation industry to be exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, may negatively affect employers' efforts to mitigate class action risk via arbitration agreement enforcement, say Charles Schoenwetter and Eric Olson at Bowman and Brooke.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • AI In Accounting Raises OT Exemption Questions

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    A recent surge in the use of artificial intelligence in accounting work calls into question whether professionals in the industry can argue they are no longer overtime exempt under the Fair Labor Standards Act, highlighting how technology could test the limits of the law for a variety of professions, say Bradford Kelley at Littler and Stephen Malone at Peloton Interactive.

  • Eye On Compliance: Employee Social Media Privacy In NY

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    A New York law that recently took effect restricts employers' ability to access the personal social media accounts of employees and job applicants, signifying an increasing awareness of the need to balance employers' interests with worker privacy and free speech rights, says Madjeen Garcon-Bonneau at Wilson Elser.

  • Draft Pay Equity Rule May Pose Contractor Compliance Snags

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    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council's recently proposed rule that would prohibit government contractors from requesting certain job applicants' salary history seems simple on the surface, but achieving compliance will be a nuanced affair for many contractors who must also adhere to state and local pay transparency laws, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Where 9th Circ. Lowe's Ruling Leaves PAGA Jurisprudence

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    Leah Kennedy and Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks discuss the legal landscape and controlling precedent around the Private Attorneys General Act that led to the Ninth Circuit's Johnson v. Lowe's decision last month on individual PAGA wage claims, and explore the open questions that it leaves.