Discrimination

  • May 24, 2024

    CBS Says 1st Amendment Dooms White Writer's Bias Suit

    CBS said a California federal judge should toss a straight white male worker's bias suit claiming he was passed over for writer roles in favor of more diverse candidates, arguing that the First Amendment allows it to tap writers based on their identity as a storytelling operation.

  • May 24, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Del Monte Workers Seek $2M Deal Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for the potential final approval of a $2 million deal in a wage and hour class action by Del Monte Foods Inc. plant workers. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • May 23, 2024

    DLA Piper Must Share Prior Pregnancy Bias Claims With Court

    A New York federal magistrate judge on Wednesday ordered DLA Piper to let her privately review previous pregnancy discrimination complaints against it as part of discovery in a former attorney's suit, an order that comes after the firm argued the burden of sharing them "far outweighs its likely benefit."

  • May 23, 2024

    Wash. DOT Cuts Deal To Exit EEOC Disability Bias Probe

    The Washington State Department of Transportation will pay $57,577 to put an end to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's investigation into a former worker's claim that he was fired after disclosing he has a disability, the federal bias watchdog announced Thursday. 

  • May 23, 2024

    Novartis Settles Ex-Saleswoman's Gender Pay Bias Suit

    Pharmaceutical giant Novartis and a former sales representative have agreed to end a suit alleging she was paid over $20,000 less than a male colleague pitching the same product, according to filings in Colorado federal court.

  • May 23, 2024

    NC Fintech Atty Sues Paymentus For Gender, Age Bias

    A former senior corporate counsel for cloud-based billing company Paymentus Corp. has slapped her former employer with a $100,000 age and gender discrimination suit in North Carolina federal court, saying she was paid less than her male colleagues and eventually fired for complaining, only to be replaced by a much younger male attorney.

  • May 23, 2024

    Wash. Atty Stops Practicing Law After Assaulting Associate

    A family law attorney in Washington state has resigned from practicing law after a series of criminal offenses, including a misdemeanor sexual assault and an attempted hate crime involving a colleague after a work-sponsored event, according to state bar association disciplinary records made public this week.

  • May 23, 2024

    Conn. To Expand Paid Sick Leave To Smaller Businesses

    More employees in Connecticut will soon become eligible for paid sick leave after the state's governor gave his blessing on a bill that expands the state's time-off requirements to include smaller businesses.

  • May 23, 2024

    NYC Mayor And Assault Accuser Spar Over Discovery 'Theatrics'

    The first conference in a lawsuit alleging New York City Mayor Eric Adams sexually assaulted a Police Department colleague in 1991 grew heated Thursday, as attorneys on both sides accused the others of improper discovery gambits.

  • May 23, 2024

    EEOC Backs Suit Over Hospital Patients' Racial Preferences

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told the Fifth Circuit it should revive a Nigerian nurse's race bias case against a Texas hospital, arguing the medical center's practice of honoring patients' requests for non-Black caregivers could demonstrate a hostile work environment.

  • May 23, 2024

    Scope Narrows In Pay Bias Suit Against MetLife CEO

    A New York federal judge backtracked on a previous order that left in place all of a female former executive's pay bias claims against MetLife's CEO, limiting the scope of the suit to reflect that he stepped into his role as head of the company only three months before she was terminated.

  • May 23, 2024

    Fisher Phillips Reinforces Calif. Labor And Employment Team

    Fisher Phillips has hired two of counsel in its Irvine, California, office to continue representing employers and helping those clients navigate a range of labor and employment matters.

  • May 22, 2024

    IT Co. Can't Sink Fired Worker's FMLA Retaliation Suit

    A Florida federal judge declined to hand an information technology company an early win in a former worker's suit claiming he was fired after he took medical leave to treat anxiety, ruling that there are enough disputes over whether the company acted illegally to send the case to trial.

  • May 22, 2024

    Justices' CFPB Alliance May Save SEC Courts, Not Chevron

    A four-justice concurrence to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision upholding the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's unique funding scheme last week carries implications for other cases pending before the court that challenge the so-called administrative state, or the permanent cadre of regulatory agencies and career government enforcers who hold sway over vast swaths of American economic life.

  • May 22, 2024

    Ex-Mich. Judge Loses Law License Challenge

    A former Detroit trial court judge's failure to object to a magistrate judge's recommendation to toss her claims means she cannot continue to pursue a discrimination and defamation complaint against the state's judicial disciplinary board, a federal judge in Michigan ruled Wednesday.

  • May 22, 2024

    6th Circ. Rejects Ex-Mich. County Worker's Disability Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit refused Wednesday to reopen a former Michigan county employee's lawsuit claiming she wasn't allowed to work from home or follow a flexible schedule because of her attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, finding she didn't show these accommodations would help her successfully do her job.

  • May 22, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs FedEx's Jury Win In Black Worker's Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit upheld a win Wednesday for FedEx in a suit brought by a Black worker who said she was fired out of racial animus after an altercation with a co-worker, unswayed by her argument that the lower court's handling of her case was fatally flawed.

  • May 22, 2024

    4 Questions About Trailblazing AI Bias Law In Colo.

    Colorado moved to the forefront of regulating artificial intelligence by requiring that developers and users of "high-risk" programs mitigate algorithmic discrimination, enacting a law experts say could serve as a model for other jurisdictions, as well as employers looking to stay ahead of the curve. Here are four questions employment attorneys are asking about the novel statute.  

  • May 22, 2024

    OSU Strikes Deal To Resolve Ex-Prof's Gender Bias Suit

    Ohio State University reached a tentative deal Wednesday with a former marketing professor to end her lawsuit accusing the school of firing her for working with outside clients while male colleagues escaped retribution, a notice in federal court said.

  • May 22, 2024

    Target Of Cyberstalking Loses 5th Circ. ADA Suit

    The Fifth Circuit upheld the dismissal of a former sales specialist's suit claiming a medical supply company violated federal disability law by refusing to separate her from a co-worker whose girlfriend had cyberstalked her, finding the company didn't know about her anxiety until after denying the requests.

  • May 22, 2024

    Amazon Defeats Fired Executive's Equal Pay Suit

    A California federal judge threw out a former Amazon executive's suit alleging the online retail behemoth unlawfully fired her after complaining that a male counterpart earned more than her, ruling that revisions to her suit hadn't fixed the lack of detail previously called out by the court.

  • May 22, 2024

    Md. Clinic Fires Worker With Faulty Vision, EEOC Tells Court

    A medical clinic fired a scheduling assistant on her first day of work after learning she suffers from vision impairments that make it difficult for her to read a computer screen, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told a Maryland federal court.

  • May 21, 2024

    NC Agency Atty Gets More Time To Prep For Bias Trial

    A North Carolina federal judge shut down the state justice department's bid to stop an attorney from calling witnesses and offering exhibits in her discrimination trial, according to a docket order that appears to give the plaintiff more time to prepare.

  • May 21, 2024

    EEOC Guidance Over Gender Identity Can't Stand, Texas Says

    The Texas attorney general requested Tuesday that a federal judge do away with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's enforcement guidance over gender identity and Title VII, arguing that the agency must be stopped from requiring employers' compliance with pronoun and bathroom accommodations.

  • May 21, 2024

    MLB Scouts' Colo. Age Bias Suit Moved To New York

    A Colorado federal judge refused to dismiss an age bias suit brought against Major League Baseball by a group of 40-and-older scouts and instead transferred the case to New York, saying he was using his discretionary authority because most defendants have no ties to his district.

Expert Analysis

  • The State Of Play In DEI And ESG 1 Year After Harvard Ruling

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    Almost a year after the U.S. Supreme Court decided Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard, attorney general scrutiny of environmental, social and governance-related efforts indicates a potential path for corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives to be targeted, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Sick Leave Insights From 'Parks And Rec'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper spoke with Lisa Whittaker at the J.M. Smucker Co. about how to effectively manage sick leave policies to ensure legal compliance and fairness to all employees, in a discussion inspired by a "Parks and Recreation" episode.

  • Navigating Title VII Compliance And Litigation Post-Muldrow

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Muldrow v. St. Louis has broadened the scope of Title VII litigation, meaning employers must reassess their practices to ensure compliance across jurisdictions and conduct more detailed factual analyses to defend against claims effectively, say Robert Pepple and Christopher Stevens at Nixon Peabody.

  • Why Employers Shouldn't Overreact To Protest Activities

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    Recent decisions from the First Circuit in Kinzer v. Whole Foods and the National Labor Relations Board in Home Depot hold eye-opening takeaways about which employee conduct is protected as "protest activity" and make a case for fighting knee-jerk reactions that could result in costly legal proceedings, says Frank Shuster at Constangy.

  • Best Practices To Accommodate Workplace Service Animals

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    Since the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recently pledged to enforce accommodations for people with intellectual, developmental and mental health-related disabilities, companies should use an interactive process to properly respond when employees ask about bringing service animals into the workplace, say Samuel Lillard and Jantzen Mace at Ogletree.

  • Kansas Workers' Comp. Updates Can Benefit Labor, Business

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    While the most significant shake-up from the April amendment to the Kansas Workers Compensation Act will likely be the increase in potential lifetime payouts for workers totally disabled on the job, other changes that streamline the hearing process will benefit both employees and companies, says Weston Mills at Gilson Daub.

  • Fostering Employee Retention Amid Shaky DEI Landscape

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    Ongoing challenges to the legality of corporate diversity, equity and inclusion programs are complicating efforts to use DEI as an employee retention tool, but with the right strategic approach employers can continue to recruit and retain diverse talent — even after the FTC’s ban on noncompetes, says Ally Coll at the Purple Method.

  • Justices' Title VII Ruling Requires Greater Employer Vigilance

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Muldrow v. St. Louis ruling expands the types of employment decisions that can be challenged under Title VII, so employers will need to carefully review decisions that affect a term, condition or privilege of employment, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 6th Circ. Bias Ruling Shows Job Evaluations Are Key Defense

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    In Wehrly v. Allstate, the Sixth Circuit recently declined to revive a terminated employee’s federal and state religious discrimination and retaliation claims, illustrating that an employer’s strongest defense in such cases is a documented employment evaluation history that justifies an adverse action, says Michael Luchsinger at Segal Mccambridge.

  • Navigating Harassment Complaints From Trans Employees

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    The Eleventh Circuit's recent decision in Copeland v. Georgia Department of Corrections, concerning the harassment of a transgender employee, should serve as a cautionary tale for employers, but there are steps that companies can take to create a more inclusive workplace and mitigate the risks of claims from transgender and nonbinary employees, say Patricia Konopka and Ann Thomas at Stinson.

  • Employer Considerations Before Title IX Rule Goes Into Effect

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    While the U.S. Department of Education's final rule on Title IX is currently published as an unofficial version, institutions and counsel should take immediate action to ensure they are prepared for the new requirements, including protections for LGBTQ+ and pregnant students and employees, before it takes effect in August, say Jeffrey Weimer and Cori Smith at Reed Smith.

  • 5 Employer Actions Now Risky After Justices' Title VII Ruling

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    Last week in Muldrow v. St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that harm didn't have to be significant to be considered discriminatory under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, making five common employer actions vulnerable to litigation, say Kellee Kruse and Briana Scholar at The Employment Law Group.

  • Breaking Down EEOC's Final Rule To Implement The PWFA

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    Attorneys at Littler highlight some of the key provisions of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's final rule and interpretive guidance implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, which is expected to be effective June 18, and departures from the proposed rule issued in August 2023.